Let’s talk about Brazilian coffee

You may have heard that Brazil is famous for its amazing coffee. If you are a coffee lover, it is another reason for you to visit our country and try the coffee from the source. If you want to know more about this drink, please read a few facts about the so-called ‘cafe Brazil’ below.

Brazil is a country especially liked by coffee gourmets. This is where the excellent coffee comes from, with each of the smallest grains having an original taste and perfect aroma. Although Ethiopia is the homeland of coffee, Brazilian plantations supply the market with the largest amount of this valuable ingredient. Brazilian coffee is appreciated by professional coffee tasters who gave it the name of a ‘specialty’, as well as regular users while sipping “little black” to an afternoon dessert in the cafe (Brazil or other countries).

 

Where does the Brazilian coffee come from?

The best coffee comes from volcanic areas, with crops above 900 m above sea level, not contaminated with pesticides – at high altitudes diseases that invade the shrubs do not develop. Most of the plantations come from the times of the conquest of Brazil by the Portuguese, who in 1719 stole plants from Guyana and founded the first plantations. Thanks to them, until 1800, coffee has changed from stimulants for the elite into a drink available for everyone. Throughout the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century, Brazil remained the main producer and almost monopolist on the market of “black gold”. 

Arabica owes its name to the Arabs, who up to the seventeenth century held the palm of priority in its cultivation. The most cultivated varieties of Arabica in Brazil are Bourbon, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Typica and Maragotype. All are characterized by a mild harmonious flavor. It is almost completely free from acidity, with low caffeine content. Good Brazilian coffee Arabica can be so easily recommended to everyone: it is a coffee with a good, classic taste. What is more, it is suitable for both espresso and cappuccino.

Brazilian coffee – how should you drink it?

In Brazil, coffee is drunk all day long – from morning to late evening. Nobody is surprised that even children in primary schools drink it. Perhaps because you usually add a lot of sugar to it. After all, coffee must be sweet! Coffee is usually served as black coffee, and less often it is drunk with milk. The trend for cappuccino and latte macchiato restaurants has also arrived here. Sweet lovers will feel like in paradise – whipped cream, sweet syrup and a little bit of sugar cane are popular additions. 

The most common home brewing method to prepare the coffee is to pour boiled water over the top of a jug with a paper filter with coffee inside. The boiling water is gradually poured, so that the infusion slowly – not too quickly – drips into a jug.

When being in Brazil, try the typical coffee with sugar in Brazil café and tell us how you liked it. Enjoy the experience.