5 amazing places to spend New Year’s Eve away from the hustle and bustle of big cities

If for some people the New Year’s Eve is synonymous with parties and noise, for others it is a perfect time to disconnect, rest and replenish energy for the next year. After an intense and busy year, there is nothing better than choosing a place away from the hustle and bustle. That is why we chose 5 amazing and quiet places to spend New Year’s Eve in peace and to have a well-deserved rest. 

Bonito

If a place is called Bonito (‘beautiful’), then it must mean something. Rivers, lakes, waterfalls and caves attract thousands of tourists looking for adventures in this “ecological Disneyland”.

One of the largest eco-tourism centers in Brazil – Bonito in Mato Grosso do Sul – is a place where you can be in real contact with nature and get to know countless species of animals. The region is known for snorkelling and is full of transparent rivers, waterfalls and caves. It is located about 300 kilometres from Campo Grande – a perfect place to spend time with family and friends.

Chapada dos Veadeiros

The Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park is located in the state of Goiás – a short distance from Brasília. This beautiful and unique place is full of mountains, waterfalls, canyons, quartz crystal formations and rock pools. 

The Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park is on the UNESCO World Heritage List and is certainly one of the most amazing places in Brazil. Away from the holiday and party atmosphere typical of the holiday season, this destination is ideal to connect with nature.

Jalapão

This new holiday destination is famous for its untouched nature and has excellent qualities for those who want to try ecotourism. Located in the Tocantins, the region has abundant waters, plateaus and hills with savanna climate, dunes and impressive rock formations. This is a must-see for sure and why not spending New Year’s Eve there right?

Cambará do Sul

Located 250 km from Porto Alegre, Cambará do Sul is less hectic than its competitors Gramado and Canela, but not less charming. The famous Itaimbezinho Canyon is 5.8 km long, and the Fortaleza Canyon is 7.5 km long. If you like hiking and want to be impressed by the beauty of Brazil, this place is for you.

Península de Maraú 

So you thought that we would not recommend spending the New Year’s Eve on the beach? It is an unforgettable experience especially away from the crowds of Copacabana. Brazilians like to jump over 7 waves and do everything that is extraordinary and unique on New Year’s Eve – you should try it at least once in your life. Península de Maraú is a real paradise on the southern coast of Bahia. Getting there is not so easy; you should consider riding a dirt road for almost 40 km or a motorboat ride. However, that’s why this place doesn’t have the same hustle and bustle of neighbouring beaches. That is why this can be a great choice for New Year’s Eve getaway. 

What to expect from Christmas dinner in Brazil?

Just in a few days, we will be celebrating Christmas. Even though it is hard to imagine this day on a sunny beach in Rio, the upcoming Christmas arouses a lot of emotions in Brazil as well. It is an extremely large country, both in terms of area and population. For this reason, Christmas traditions vary greatly from region to region. Brazilians also wait for this time of the year and prepare for it similarly as people in Europe – buying gifts, Christmas trees, preparing Christmas dinner, meeting family and friends and watching Christmas movie hits. 

Most of the Christmas customs derive from the Christian tradition and they have been adapted to local traditions and the climate prevailing in Brazil. 

Learn a little bit more about Christmas in this beautiful country.

Christmas decorations and presents

 

If you visit Brazil, you will notice Christmas trees and even palm trees illuminating with lights. Brazilians prepare their decorations in November or even in October. There are no rules when it comes to colour or the number of lights – people like to show their imagination. 

Santa Claus is certainly the most recognizable symbol of the holidays in this tropical region. All children love an old man with a beard and are happy to come to shopping malls to sit on his lap and get a small gift or candies.

Christmas time is, of course, a time when people spend time with their families and friends but the Christmas shopping madness is certainly a thing here as well. Trips to shopping malls with long lists of Christmas presents became a tradition as well.

Christmas dinner 

As we mentioned before, spending Christmas with family is very important in Brazil – it also involves Christmas dinner preparation. It usually takes place in the house of the oldest member of the family or the person that has the biggest house. 

 

Christmas dinner usually consists of the following dishes:

    • turkey,
    • Chester (chicken that has especially large chest and more meat than a normal chicken),
    • pernil (fresh ham),
    • salpicão (a mix of vegetables with mayonnaise),
    • farofa (toasted cassava or cornflour mixture),
    • rice with raisins,
    • fish,

 

  • Rabanada for dessert (kind of a french toast – sliced bread soaked in eggs with milk and fried).

 

 

Christmas dinner takes place on December 24, just after midnight. Kids get their presents before dinner as they will probably be too tired to stay up late. The party ends late at night.

December 25 is usually a churrasco (barbecue) time when everybody eats the food that was left from the day before. Normally, we usually do too much food for Christmas dinner, so we finish it the next day with our family and friends.

Brazil is a country extremely mixed in terms of nationality and ethnicity, which is why its Christmas traditions are a kind of hybrid of customs from different parts of the world. We hope that we more or less showed you how this special time looks here. 

Merry Christmas everybody.

What is the population of Brazil

Another topic that we would like to talk about is the population of Brazil. If you are thinking of going to Brazil, it is best to learn a bit about the country beforehand. We recommend learning about the climate, the most interesting tourist attractions, language, history and of course people. You do not have to know everything. Just basic facts thanks to which your trip will gain another dimension. We encourage you of course to read more about it. We will just make an introduction to this topic below.

The population of Brazil – basic facts

 

The ethnic composition of Brazil’s population is closely related to its history. Before the country was covered by the colonial expansion of the Portuguese, the inhabitants were mainly Indians. The development of plantations caused that slaves from Africa began to be imported. Over time, the white and black people began to mix. Another turning point was the independence of Brazil, which made immigrants from Europe come to Brazil. 

At present, half of Brazil’s population are white people and creole. Next, the black people, Indians, Mottos and Mestys. Representatives of specific groups are centered in specific regions. For example, the southern and south-eastern areas are inhabited by white people. East and north-east are inhabited by the black people and Indians are concentrated in the Amazon. Inhabitants are not evenly distributed throughout the country. They mainly focus on the coast to 500 km inland. The migration of people within the country occurs due to disproportions in socio-economic development. 

Catholicism is the most widely professed religion (64.6%). Then, there are the following: Protestantism (22,2%), Irreligion (8%), Spiritism (2%) and others.

 An extraordinary ethnic mix has made the local culture unique. The most known event in the whole world, that makes Brazil different from other countries, is the famous carnival in Rio de Janeiro. The slaves from Angola initiated samba that became a national dance. Everybody knows samba and knows where do people learn it the most. Those are those little things that make our country unique.

Brazil population – numbers

The population of Brazil in 2019 will grow by 1 525 000 and it will reach 213 863 000 people in 2020. Migration has increased the population by 6,000 people a year, including emigration and immigration. The average number of births in Brazil is 2 855 284 a year, the number of deaths is 1 360 165 a year. The natural increase will be around 0.70 percent per year. Since 1980, the population density of Brazil has changed from 14.5 to 25.0 in 2017.

We hope that we have given you enough information when answering the question ‘what is the population of Brazil’? As we have mentioned before, we encourage you to learn more about it before coming to Brazil. However, those basic facts should be enough for you. If you have any doubts or questions, do not hesitate to write them in the comment section below.

 

Let’s talk about Brazilian coffee

You may have heard that Brazil is famous for its amazing coffee. If you are a coffee lover, it is another reason for you to visit our country and try the coffee from the source. If you want to know more about this drink, please read a few facts about the so-called ‘cafe Brazil’ below.

Brazil is a country especially liked by coffee gourmets. This is where the excellent coffee comes from, with each of the smallest grains having an original taste and perfect aroma. Although Ethiopia is the homeland of coffee, Brazilian plantations supply the market with the largest amount of this valuable ingredient. Brazilian coffee is appreciated by professional coffee tasters who gave it the name of a ‘specialty’, as well as regular users while sipping “little black” to an afternoon dessert in the cafe (Brazil or other countries).

 

Where does the Brazilian coffee come from?

The best coffee comes from volcanic areas, with crops above 900 m above sea level, not contaminated with pesticides – at high altitudes diseases that invade the shrubs do not develop. Most of the plantations come from the times of the conquest of Brazil by the Portuguese, who in 1719 stole plants from Guyana and founded the first plantations. Thanks to them, until 1800, coffee has changed from stimulants for the elite into a drink available for everyone. Throughout the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century, Brazil remained the main producer and almost monopolist on the market of “black gold”. 

Arabica owes its name to the Arabs, who up to the seventeenth century held the palm of priority in its cultivation. The most cultivated varieties of Arabica in Brazil are Bourbon, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Typica and Maragotype. All are characterized by a mild harmonious flavor. It is almost completely free from acidity, with low caffeine content. Good Brazilian coffee Arabica can be so easily recommended to everyone: it is a coffee with a good, classic taste. What is more, it is suitable for both espresso and cappuccino.

Brazilian coffee – how should you drink it?

In Brazil, coffee is drunk all day long – from morning to late evening. Nobody is surprised that even children in primary schools drink it. Perhaps because you usually add a lot of sugar to it. After all, coffee must be sweet! Coffee is usually served as black coffee, and less often it is drunk with milk. The trend for cappuccino and latte macchiato restaurants has also arrived here. Sweet lovers will feel like in paradise – whipped cream, sweet syrup and a little bit of sugar cane are popular additions. 

The most common home brewing method to prepare the coffee is to pour boiled water over the top of a jug with a paper filter with coffee inside. The boiling water is gradually poured, so that the infusion slowly – not too quickly – drips into a jug.

When being in Brazil, try the typical coffee with sugar in Brazil café and tell us how you liked it. Enjoy the experience.